Image: CLAIM: Kylie Cosmetics products are a stew of toxic ingredients including artificial colors and synthetic chemicals

(Natural News) The mainstream news is awash with stories of flattery and praise for Kylie Kardashian Jenner, the youngest daughter of former Olympic athlete-turned-transgender Bruce “Caitlyn” Jenner, for becoming the youngest self-made billionaire ever at just 21 years old. But Jenner accomplished this feat not with honesty and integrity, but rather by selling overpriced and highly-toxic beauty products to unsuspecting youth who foolishly idolize her as some kind of female “hero.”

One of Jenner’s most popular lines of beauty products are her “Kylie Lip Kits,” which contain various lipsticks and matching lip liners that are touted as the “secret weapon to create the perfect ‘Kylie Lip,'” for those who apparently want to look just like Kylie Jenner. Kylie Lip Kits are apparently so popular among obsessive young women that they often sell out faster than they can manufactured – kind of like the Tickle Me Elmo and Beanie Babies crazes of the past.

But just how safe are these mass-marketed beauty products often used by children? Not that safe, it turns out. In fact, reports continue to surface about women who say they have been harmed as a result of using Kylie Lip Kits as directed, including a woman by the name of Elizabeth Castellano who says she had to be hospitalized as a result of using Jenner’s products.

Castellano explains she was under the false impression that, because of their high price point, Kylie Lip Kits were “composed of the finest and healthiest ingredients.” But as it turns out, they’re filled with all sorts of chemicals that caused Castellano – and likely many other girls out there – to suffer serious symptoms that rapidly deteriorated her quality of life.

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“It started out with a migraine, then a fever, followed by nausea, and turned into overall weakness,” Castellano wrote in an article for Babson College‘s Her College website. “At first I did not think anything of it, until I went to my doctor, got a blood test, and learned that my white blood cell count was terrifyingly low.”

For more related news, be sure to check out ToxicChemicalsNews.com and ChemicalViolence.com.

Kylie Lip Kits reportedly contain an ILLEGAL chemical additive that’s been banned by the FDA for being unsafe

After many long and tedious hours of research, Castellano says she discovered that a toxic, petroleum-based chemical ingredient known as “Orange 5,” found in Kylie Lip Kits, was the cause of her severe health problems. And after a little more research, Castellano learned that Orange 5 shouldn’t even be in Kylie Lip Kits at all, seeing as how it’s been banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“This ingredient, as stated by the FDA, is expected to be harmful and toxic, and suspected to be an environmental toxin, specifically a bioaccumulative,” Castellano explains about the extreme toxicity of Orange 5. “I guess being a Kardashian in today’s world constitutes the right for her to use banned ingredients and sell these harmful cosmetics for a high price.”

Not only is Orange 5 bioaccumulative in the environment, but it similarly bioaccumulates inside people’s bodies, leading to chronic poisoning – something that Castellano learned the hard way, seeing as how the Kylie Lip Kits that she had purchased and was using nearly killed her before she identified the culprit.

“30% or more of a single lipstick ends up in our stomach,” Castellano warns. “Before you take the plunge, ensure every single ingredient in the product is suitable for our bodies. And don’t assume that just because it is expensive, well-loved, and from Kylie Jenner, that it guarantees satisfaction and safety.”

Kylie Cosmetics appear to be loaded with other potentially harmful chemicals like aluminum that aren’t safe, doctors warn

And it’s not just Castellano who’s sounding the alarm about the dangers of Kylie Cosmetics – a number of doctors have also issued warnings that women, and especially pregnant women, might want to carefully consider whether or not the immense safety risks are really worth trying to look like some celebrity who couldn’t care less about the health of people who purchase her products.

Dr. Jacques Moritz, for instance, issued a warning back in 2017 about Kylie Jenner’s “Bronze Eyeshadow Palette” and “Ultra Glow Loose Powder Highlighter,” both from the “Vacation” collection, and both of which contain aluminum – which is widely condemned as being potentially toxic for unborn children still developing in their mothers’ wombs.

“The powder also includes Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate, which is a category C and should be avoided,” Dr. Moritz reportedly told Billboard magazine.

Aluminum chloride hexahydrate, by the way, is the same ingredient often used in antiperspirant products to mitigate perspiration. And as we’ve previously warned, aluminum-containing antiperspirant products have been directly linked to causing cancer, as they exert a strong estrogen-like effect inside the body that can trigger the growth and spread of breast cancer cells.

Other questionable, potentially harmful ingredients found in Kylie Cosmetics products include a whole slew of petroleum-based coloring agents, and unpronounceable additives like polypropylsilsesquioxane, isododecane, diisopropyl dimer dilinoleate, disteardimonium hectorite, synthetic fluorphlogopite, and bismuth oxychloride – just to name a few.

The Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) Skin Deep Cosmetics Database classifies Kylie Cosmetics products as “High Hazard,” with an average safety rating of 7/10 – 10 being most hazardous.

“We assess the ingredients listed on the labels of personal care products based on data in toxicity and regulatory databases, government and health agency assessments and the open scientific literature,” explains EWG about its methodology for assessing cosmetics safety.

Sources for this article include:

Cosmopolitan.com

HerCampus.com

ThisIsInsider.com

NaturalNews.com

EWG.org


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